Adult or Gamer, is it time to grow up?

Being an adult and a gamer does not go hand-in-hand. I just moved out on my own and this total independence has taught me the value of my free time; meaning I now have no free time. My free time is so sacred these days it’s as rare as a Miley Cyrus hit song.

Growing older, I’ve learned that sacrifices are needed to be made to get ahead in the game. I am always being productive, and I love it; I am trying to stay more focused on the most crucial stuff in my life. However, this has meant my overall gaming exposure has suffered as a consequence. I try to keep up with the latest and greatest games, but it’s difficult when there are bills to pay and you have a 9 to 5 job.

All the free time

As a kid, you couldn’t afford to buy any games other than what was given to you. If you had a shit game, you just had shit; and you had until the end of time to play that shit.

Video games have always been a form of relaxation to me. It’s been escapism since I can remember, and I prefer the medium to all other forms of entertainment. As a child video games fast became an obsession. There was something so captivating about interacting with a world outside of ours, waiting to be explored, experimented on and, most likely, blown up.

“As a kid, you couldn’t afford to buy any games other than what was given to you. If you had a shit game, you just had shit; and you had until the end of time to play that shit.”

To combat the substantial lack of free time for gaming, I have developed a collection of retro video games from my childhood. I am certain that I’ll probably never have the time to play 90% of what I’ve accumulated over many years. However, I find it comforting knowing those games are there if I ever want/need to play them. For example, I can foresee an emergency situation, in which I urgently need to play Parappa The Rapper extremely drunk at 4am.

Collecting old video games is about retaining that nostalgic feeling of having so many games and so much free time – as a child gamer, that era was a time of innocence, where summer holidays felt like years and, to me, gaming was at its peak.

I feel also that I’ve grown away from the traditional notion of a ‘nerd’. I don’t feel like a nerd, and I’ve never really fitted in with the gaming community, as I’m too unorthodox to ever really fit in. I think my issue is that I like sports and fashion too much, and it’s very clear to me that at gaming events, people see me as an outsider. This might sound harsh, but I look unusual at gaming events because I take pride in my appearance. I don’t like wearing gaming t-shirts with logos, and I’d rather drink water than Mountain Dew. Monster Energy Drink tastes like ass. This is one of the many reasons why I don’t fit in with the typical gaming crowd.

“This might sound harsh, but I look unusual at gaming events because I take pride in my appearance, and I’d rather drink water than Mountain Dew.”

However, I am proud that I am an unusual gamer. I think it’s important to have varied interests to have an informed opinion on any topic. I take pride in my ability to hold a conversation, and my superhuman power in being able to occasionally talk to the opposite gender.

Gaming Adapts to your lifestyle

I enjoy my busy life. I would rather be busy than bored. As you get older, you realise that time is precious, and you have to make the most of the years you have, especially when you are young. But, however busy your schedule gets, if you love video games, gaming adapts to your lifestyle. Gaming will always be a part of me. I have been writing about video games for my entire adult life. It would be insane to stop now.